Ferdy von Wren: The Fighting Waterfowl

Treasures from the National Gallery of Duckburg. Photo: Finnish National Gallery / Hannu Aaltonen

Treasures from the National Gallery of Duckburg. Photo: Finnish National Gallery / Hannu Aaltonen

Ferdy von Wren, Duckburgian
The Fighting Waterfowl
National Gallery of Duckburg

Art in Duckburg has a long tradition of depictions of nature. The city’s founder, Cornelius Coot, was the first to be enchanted by the wilderness surrounding Fort Duckburg, and his poetry eulogizes the marshland where he was about to found his bustling town. Few cities can boast such variety in landscape: blistering desert, ocean, mounting snowdrifts and jagged mountain peaks reaching for the skies. Ducks cavorting in Nordic woodland is therefore not a curious sight.

Ferdy von Wren’s The Fighting Waterfowl presents an archetypal love triangle in a sylvan setting. Cousins Donald Duck and Gladstone Gander have courted the same maiden for decades, and the dispute is still ongoing. Von Wren’s bird paintings are often dynamic and lively, and The Fighting Waterfowl is bursting with dramatic tension. With bold brushstrokes, von Wren captures the charged moment just before an all-out scuffle.

Over the years, The Fighting Waterfowl has been seen to symbolize the battle of good and evil. The eternal conflict between an unlucky everyduck and Fortune’s favourite son inspires tenacity in the face of insurmountable odds.